My Home, NC | Football Heroes

My Home, NC | Football Heroes


♪ [whistle blows] -[Announcer] Five yard penalty. – I’m Zach Jackson. – I’m Will Jackson. And our home is
Chinquapin, North Carolina. We’ve been playing football
since seventh grade. – I think this is our
fifth season, sixth season. – [Will] I play
cornerback and wing back. – [Zach] I play the same thing. – [Coach] Come on,
block that man, 54. – [Heather] Do think
that’s ’cause you’re twins? – [Both] Yes. – [Will] We’re type-1 diabetics. We’re having to
manage our blood sugar to make sure it’s not
too high or too low, so we can still play. – [Karen Voiceover]
I’m Karen Jackson. – [Jarrett Voiceover]
And I’m Jarrett Jackson. – We’re the parents
of Will and Zach. They boys both have been
diagnosed with type-1 diabetes autoimmune illness that
affects the beta cells in the pancreas, makes them,
kills them off essentially. And so they do not
produce insulin. – I was five when
I was diagnosed. Remember being
hospitals, very sick, and then they just
told me I had diabetes, I was kind of like,
you know, okay, I’m five, so I don’t
know what that means. – It was still kind of
tough seeing, you know, having to see Will have
it all those years. – [Will] To start giving shots,
and sticking needles in me like three, four times a day. Pricking like eight times a day. So that was kind of hard
on me as like a little kid. – And I never really thought
I was going to get it, but yeah, then I
did, so I already kind of knew a lot more. – Make sure, when you
eat lunch, that you get some protein in there. And the constant concern
about hypoglycemia and going really
low, bottoming out. – Diabetes, it’s relentless. It doesn’t give you any day off. So for me to see
the boys out there, their strength and resiliency, to press on and not let
diabetes hold them back, I admire that in
them tremendously. – [Heather] Is this
what you normally do? You’re going to
check, what are you– – Yeah, I’m going
to check right now because we just ate,
and then after that, I’m going to see
what it is right now so I can go ahead
and give a correction if I need some insulin, if
I maybe need some more food. – 366, that’s a little high. They get too high, I
got to set them out. They get too low, I
got to set them out. We got to get them
pretty much stable. Jackson, let’s get your
sugars before half, alright? – [Will Voiceover] Kierlin
Michael’s very good with it, ’cause he’ll get
you taken care of, and he won’t let
you on the field until you’re good to go. – 288. You’re running a little high. Hop on your pump for
halftime, alright? – High is very much,
you’re very thirsty, you body might start
to cramp a little bit. – You don’t hydrate at
all, or if you don’t give the right amount of
insulin you can go high and you can get really sick. – We get dehydrated, that
could be hospital trip. – [Zach Voiceover]
Way I look at it, I can do anything a
normal person can. – [Will Voiceover] Not
going to try to have it be a limiting factor, so just
going to push through it, and enjoy, and do
what I want to do. – For a lot of younger
kids who get it, they might not
know what it’s like and you’d be scared of
it, so hope they can look at us and see that this doesn’t really stop
you or anything.

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