Canadian Invitational Blind Sailing Regatta

Canadian Invitational Blind Sailing Regatta


– [Announcer] This is an
AMI This Week Short Cut. – [Anthony] I’m
Anthony McLachlan for Accessible Media. (air horn blaring) With that the Canadian
Invitational Blind
Sailing Regatta kicked off a weekend of
racing on Lake Ontario. The three-day event is the first of its kind in Canada
and it’s no surprise that David Brown is the
skipper of his own team. – This event is really important so that people locally in Canada have an event to learn about
blind sailing regattas. They need a place to learn, to increase their skills if they want to then make a leap to international competitions. – [Anthony] David knows
all about making that leap. In fact, he has
represented Canada at six World Blind
Sailing Championships. Including a second
place finish in 2015. His teammate and main
trimmer, 19-year-old Josh Cook, has spent a
little less time on the water but thanks to David’s
mentoring over the years at the CNIB’s Camp
Abilities sailing program, he feels well prepared
for the regatta despite some nerves. – Before I actually
stepped on a boat at camp I didn’t know what half
the stuff was called. And Dave was teaching
me a lot about that so everything I know is
probably because of him. I was getting nervous ’cause
I’ have never actually worked the main trim on
this size boat so I got pretty nervous of that. But when I got out here
it was pretty good. It didn’t seem too hard. My crews are very much helping
me out with that stuff. – [Anthony] With eight
races over the course of the regatta, Josh knows
this is a great opportunity to soak up even more
knowledge racing with a world class skipper. – [David] Keep going. Pull, pull, pull. (rope cranking) That’s it. – There’s actually
still a lot more that I could
probably still learn. Like all the calls
that he’s been doing, I still don’t
understand some of them. But I’m actually
catching on to them. – And the distance to mark
is how many boat lengths? – Three. – Okay. Count them down please. – [Anthony] The five teams
competing at the regatta are made up of
four sailors each. A blind or low vision
skipper, a sighted tactician, a blind or low vision main
trimmer, who is in charge of the main sail, and
a sighted jib trimmer, who helps with the sail on the
7.5 meter flying tiger boat. The sharing of information on
the boat is key to going fast. Especially between the
skipper and tactician. Bruce Rand and David
must discuss the race in real time. – Giving David subtle
cues as how to make or what I feel will
make the boat go faster. Those are those
finite adjustments and then we get into
a rhythm and then I’m sort of evaluating how
much input David needs. He’ll give me feedback
if he needs more input. He’ll hear sounds on the water and want to know what those are. He’ll ask questions
about trim performance, what we think we need
to do to go faster. So there’s a constant
communication back and forth. – Okay, you’re a
little high David. – Yep, I’m coming back down. There we are. – [Anthony] The
Canadian Invitational
Blind Sailing Regatta is being run out of the National One Design Sailing
Academy in Oakville. Co-chair of the event,
Kim Moffat, says that they are hoping this
is just the beginning and plan to double
in size next year. – Ten boats, 40
sailors, away we go. Try the match racing as well,
where it’s all blind teams on the boats and that whole
very interesting logistic, as it goes from there and expand as to what’s being done for
sailing here in the area. That’s the goal right now, is if we can make
this an annual event. That’s what everybody’s
thinking is right now. – [Anthony] And as
the regatta grows, David wants everybody to
know what’s most important. – Winning. No. Actually some of the
best part of sailing is meeting wonderful people
from all over the world. Nice to meet new people that
all love the same sport, have the same love of sailing, and it’s a sport you can
basically do for life. – [Anthony] For Accessible
Media, I’m Anthony McLachlan. (waves swishing) – [David] Where’d that wind go? Let’s follow it. Which way did it go?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *