Building DIY adjustable floating shelves with LED lighting (no drilling)

Building DIY adjustable floating shelves with LED lighting (no drilling)


Today we build floating shelves for a tight
niche in our house. We build them in a way that they can be easily
adjusted and removed – and we will integrate LED light into one of the shelves. We have this awkward small niche besides the
chimney in our house that I would like to use for storage. One of the items that I would like to put
here are systainers housing most of the tools that I need to do everyday work around the
house like hanging pictures or smaller repair work. The systainer is only a few millimeters smaller
than the niche so I can‘t build a frame to hold shelves and to make things even more
complicated I would like to make the shelves adjustable. To get started I use hotglue and some thin
strips of foam in order to get a template of that niche. Living in an old house we can safely assume
that none of these angles is anywhere near 90 degrees. From the form I take the angles and distances
and cut shelves from 12 mm plywood matching the niche minus a few millimeter. If I would not want adjustable shelves I could
screw a bracket into the wall and place the pieces on top of these. To make the shelves adjustable I create several
excenter levers. You can find a ready-made template on my website
and I will add a link in the description to another video where I explain in detail how
to create such a lever design. Four of these excenter levers are mounted
to the sides by drilling a hole and securing them with a dowel. To distribute pressure more evenly I screw
small wooden blocks to the board and hotglue a strip of MDF to their outside so that both
levers are pressing against the wood and do not rub against the wall. While the shelves would work like this the
plywood edges don’t look very pleasing. As most of the furniture next to the niche
is made from oak and pine I decide to edgeband the pine plywood with a few scrap pieces of
oak. To give them a more interesting look I structure
them with a small disc on a powercarving tool before gluing them to the edge of the plywood. Finally I give the shelves a light sanding
and apply two coats of oil. The shelves can now be put in place. I hold them in place and start to tighten
the excenters a little bit. It is easy to adjust them up or down and make
sure that they are level. While the lower shelves are finished I would
like to cover the excenter levers for the upper shelves. To cover the underside I will use 6 millimeter
plywood with the edge covered by thin strips of oak. I drill a shallow recess in some small scrap
pieces of plywood with the same thickness as the one I used for the excenters. Within that recess I drill two holes for small
rare earth magnets. Next I screw these wooden blocks to the shelf. By putting washers on the magnets and a bit
of epoxy on the washers I glue them to the thin plywood. This way the thin bottom clips easily to the
shelf and is quickly removed. If the distance between the magnet and the
washer is too wide shim the wooden blocks with some cardboard to ensure a good fit. In one of the upper shelves I would like to
display some stuff and would like to use a spotlight to highlight it. I bought a small LED light from amazon and
cut a strip of plywood to the same thickness as the LED light. By cutting this piece in half I create a frame
that is exactly the size of the LED light. First I will use this template to remove most
of the material with a drill and a jigsaw. After the bulk of the material is removed
I use a flush trim bit on the router table to transfer the shape of my template to the
shelf bottom. After squaring the corners with a chisel the
LED light can be pressed into the opening and is hold in place by friction. With the bottoms finished the shelves can
be installed. It is easy to adjust the position of the shelves
which will give us a lot of versatility in how we are going to use this space. Working with excenters was really fun and
it is impressive how much weight the shelves can hold. If you are interested in more project and
jig building videos please subscribe to my channel.

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